Before and After Surgery pictures are available on our social sites:

social social

Hammertoe deformity correction

Hammertoe is a deformity, when the toe’s middle joint becomes permanently bent upward, resembling a hammer. This condition may often happen together with other toe problems, commonly corns develop on top of the middle joint of the hammertoe. People, who have this deformity, try to manage it by treating the symptoms. This includes changing or stretching shoe-wear and padding the toe for comfort. You may consider surgery, if you still experience discomfort from the hammertoe. Depending on the flexibility of the hammertoe and the preference of your orthopaedic foot surgeon, hammertoe can be corrected using several different methods of surgery.

How Is the Surgery Performed?

Most often, hammertoe treatment is done as a same day procedure, after which the patient can go home the same day as the surgery. The patient can choose if they wish to receive general anaesthesia, or if they prefer being awake after being given medicine, which temporarily numbs the foot.

What Should Be Known After Surgery?

  • After the hammertoe correction surgery, the patient may have to wear a special shoe, to help with walking. Normally, recovery takes a few weeks depending on the type of procedure performed.
  • The doctor will ask you to keep your foot elevated at the level of your heart for the first few weeks after surgery. This requires lying on a couch or bed with your foot up. A walker or crutches may be needed after surgery depending on the patient’s ability to walk.
  • Your surgeon will take out the sutures in two to three weeks after surgery, and pins will be taken out within a few weeks, if they were used. Before putting the foot under water, stitches and pins need to be removed.
  • Your surgeon might ask you to exercise the toe at home after surgery. This helps to preserve motion and flexibility in the toe.
  • The patient may not be able to drive a car for a couple of weeks depending on the method of surgery performed, if the hammertoe was on their right foot.
  • It is normal for swelling to occur after surgery. It may take up to a year before the swelling fades away.

Achilles tendon repair

During the repair of Achilles tendon, the surgeon restores the anatomy and function of this tendon. The rope-like structure, which connects the muscle to the bone, is called a tendon. In order to move the bone, the muscle contracts and pulls on the tendon. The Achilles tendon is the strongest and largest tendon of the body, which connects the calf muscle to the heel bone.  This muscle and tendon system creates the majority of the force, which pushes the foot down when walking.

It is necessary to repair the Achilles tendon, when:

  • After a trauma a large part of the tendon was damaged;
  • A referral to a physician was delayed for several weeks after the trauma, and the ends of the tendon retracted too far to be stitched together;
  • An inflammation occurs in the Achilles tendon;
  • An infection or a complication occurs after the surgery, and this might lead to a tendon defect after healing;
  • After a surgical lengthening of the tibia;
  • The foot is misshaped, when the foot is in an abnormal position, and it is required to lengthen the Achilles tendon to restore the patient’s ability to walk with the full weight on his/her foot;

How Is the Surgery Performed?

The patient receives local anaesthesia during the surgery. The duration of the surgery can vary from 90 minutes to 3 hours to complete, depending on the complexity of the condition. The defected area of the tendon is stitched, and the gap is closed using either a part of the same Achilles tendon or a piece transferred from another tendon.

What Should Be Known After Surgery?

The patient has to wear a special cast that immobilizes the foot for 6 to 8 weeks immediately after the surgery. The surgeon removes the sutures 12 to 14 days after the procedure.

Achilles tendon rupture repair

During the Achilles tendon repair, surgeon reconnects the calf muscles with the heel bone to restore push-off strength of the foot. The patient receives local anaesthesia and the procedure is completed within 45 to 90 minutes.

There are several surgical techniques to restore a ruptured Achilles tendon. Most common approach is for the surgeon to stitch the ends of the tendon with special strong sutures, and perform a precise reconstruction.

After the surgery, the sutures are removed after 12 to 14 days and the patient needs to wear a special for 4 to 6 weeks, which immobilises the foot and helps the Achilles tendon heal.

Shoulder arthroscopy

During shoulder reconstruction surgery (also known as arthroscopy) the surgeon can repair the tears of rotator cuff, a recurring shoulder dislocation, or a torn surface (articular) cartilage. The surgery is performed using a tiny camera (arthroscope), which is placed into the body through a small incision and the surgeon is able to monitor the are through a video screen.

How Is the Surgery Performed?

The patient can undergo local or general anaesthesia. Depending on the complexity of damage, the procedure might take from 45 minutes to 4 hours to complete. Special suture anchors are used to fix the tears of the tendons and the glenoid labrum. When the surgeon repairs the torn cartilage, a part of the coracoid process is removed.

What Should Be Known After Surgery?

  • After 12-14 days, the stitches are removed;
  • After 1 week, the patient is encouraged to exercise with a passive range of motion exercises, and after 3-4 weeks – active range of motion exercises;
  • Within 2 – 4 months, most patients resume their daily activities.

Arthroscopic knee ligament reconstruction

One of the most common knee injuries are anterior and posterior cruciate ligament tears. They commonly occur when skiing or in contact sports. When these ligaments rip, patients experience a sense of instability in their knee joint. Conservative treatment or ordinary ligament suturing is not sufficient in this condition. In order to restore knee stability, the ligament must be reconstructed using autografts, for example, fragments of other ligaments or tendons harvested from the same patient.

The surgery is done applying a minimally invasive arthroscopic approach. During the procedure, a thin, pencil-sized instrument equipped with a video camera, called an arthroscope, is used, and the surgeons’ moves are watched through a video screen.

How Is the Surgery Performed?

The patient receives spinal anaesthesia and the procedure takes from 40 to 90 minutes, depending on the complexity of the condition. During arthroscopic reconstruction surgery, several small incisions (usually two or three) are made around the knee. The doctor pumps sterile saline solution into the knee through one of the incisions, in order to wash blood and expand the targeted area. This is necessary to allow the surgeon to see the knee structures more clearly.

Then, an arthroscope is introduced into the knee through a small incision, which is less than one centimetre. One or two additional incisions of the same size are made to insert arthroscopic instruments. Graft is harvested through other additional incisions. With the guidance of the arthroscope, a new ligament formed from the graft is put into the knee joint via special tunnels and is locked in place in the area of the femur and the tibia with the use of special implants.

What Should Be Known After Surgery?

  • On the first day after the procedure, partial weight bearing on the affected foot is allowed;
  • For two weeks, the patient should apply ice should to the operated knee;
  • One to two times per week it is necessary to re-dress the wound;
  • After 10-14 days, the sutures are removed;
  • After three weeks the patient should start rehabilitation;
  • It is recommended to abstain from physical activity for four weeks. The patient can resume light jogging after four months, and is allowed to return to contact sports after six months;
  • The patient can resume routine activities completely within two to three months.

Arthroscopic shoulder decompression

Shoulder impingement occurs due to a narrowed space between the acromial process of the scapula and the humerus, so the motions of the shoulder joint become limited and painful. You may experience symptoms of discomfort, intense shoulder pain when raising the arms above the head, reaching back or while sleeping on the affected shoulder. People who frequently work with their arms raised above their heads are more likely to develop shoulder impingement syndrome, trauma and inflammation in the area can contribute to the development.

How Is the Surgery Performed?

During the surgery, the patient undergoes local or general anaesthesia. Depending on the extent of damage, the procedure might take from 30 to 90 minutes to complete.  A minimally invasive arthroscopic approach is employed during the surgery. An arthroscope is a thin, pencil-sized instrument equipped with a video camera that all the surgeons’ actions could be seen on a video screen. The surgeon removes a part of the coracoid process and restores the normal function of the shoulder during arthroscopic shoulder decompression.

What Should be Known After Surgery?

  • After 12-14 days, the sutures are removed;
  • After one week, passive range of motion exercises are encouraged, and after three to four weeks – an active range of motion exercises;
  • The patient can resume routine activities completely within 2-4 months.

Lateral epicondylitis treatment

Lateral epicondylitis (also commonly referred to as tennis elbow) is an inflammation of the tendons, which join the forearm muscles on the outer part of the elbow. The most prominent symptom is chronic pain at the lateral or medial parts of the elbow after unusual physical load, when the tendon is damaged from repeating the same motion too frequently. Surgical treatment of lateral epicondylitis required, when conservative treatment methods are not effective.

How Is the Surgery Performed?

The patient receives local anaesthesia and the procedure is completed within 30-45 minutes. During the surgery, the inflammation-damaged tissues are removed. Since the inflammation is caused by repetitive and stressful motions, the surgeon releases and reattaches the affected tendon to another place on the bone. This way irritation is reduced and a range of motion of the joint changes slightly.

What Should be Known After Surgery?

  • Once or twice a week the wound should be redressed;
  • After 10-14 days, the sutures are removed;
  • After two weeks usual motions at the elbow joint can be resumed, and more strenuous physical activity can be resumed after four to six weeks.

Forearm fracture repair (osteosynthesis)

Forearm fracture repair (also called Osteosynthesis) is a surgical procedure during which the ends of broken (fractured) bones are stabilized and joined by mechanical instruments such as metal plates, pins, rods, wires or screws. This treatment technique is finer than conservative treatment, because it enables the restoration of the structural integrity of the bone and early movement of the extremity. Also, this method lowers the risk of complications during bone healing process.

How Is the Surgery Performed?

The surgery can take from 30 to 90 minutes to complete and the patient can undergo local or general anaesthesia. An open approach is involved during the surgical procedure. Once the surgeon restores the integrity of the bone, it is fixed with proper implants (plates, screws, or other mechanical means).

What Should be Known After Surgery?

  • For 4-6 weeks, the patient’s arm is immobilized in a plaster or cosmetic cast;
  • Once or twice a week the wound should be re-dressed;
  • After 10-14 days, the sutures are removed;
  • Usually, after 12 weeks the bones heal and the patient is able to resume routine activities.
  • Metal instruments (screws, plates etc.) are removed when the bones heal completely, usually after 1 year following the surgical procedure.

Metal construction removal

When a patient undergoes a surgery, during which special metal implants (for example: plates, pins, rods, wires or screws) are used, a surgical procedure is required to remove those instruments. The metal construction removal is performed, when the bones have healed completely, usually after a year from the previous surgery.

How Is the Surgery Performed?

The patient may undergo local, spinal, or general anaesthesia. Duration of the surgery can vary and strongly depends on the number of metal constructions used and their placement.  The surgical procedure embraces an open approach. Surgical incisions for removing the implants are usually placed at the location of scars. The doctor removes metal constructions using special instruments.

The duration of the surgery depends on the bones from which the implants are taken out:

  • When the metal constructions are removed from the humerus or the femur (long bones of a human) – it is a large-scale surgical procedure;
  • When the metal constructions are removed from the forearm bones, tibia, or clavicle – a moderate-scale surgical procedure;
  • When the metal constructions are removed from the bones of the hand and foot – a small-scale surgical procedure.

What Should be Known After Surgery?

  • Once or twice a week the wound should be re-dressed;
  • After 10-14 days, the sutures are removed;
  • The patient can resume routine activities after the surgical wounds heal completely;
  • Depending on the extent of surgery, the doctor may give you specific postoperative care guidelines.

Hallux valgus (bunion) correction

Hallux valgus (also referred to as bunion) is the misalignment of the great toe, when it points toward the lesser toes and the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint forms a bump, which can swell and cause pain. In severe conditions the big toe might go over or under the second toe.

How Is the Surgery Performed?

The duration of the hallux valgus correction is between 20 and 90 minutes, depending on the severity of the deformity. The patient usually receives local anaesthesia. The goal of the surgery is to restore the normal function of the joint by correcting the deviation of the first metatarsal and removing bony prominences.The surgeon removes the bony prominences, repositions the bone into a proper location, and fixes it with special plates and screws. Finally, the tendons and ligaments around the joint are repaired.

What Should Be Known After Surgery?

  • Usually, the patient can step on the heel of the affected foot, while wearing a special surgical shoe right after the surgery;
  • The daily routines of the patient’s are completely resumed within 6 to 12 weeks;
  • It is necessary to re-dress the surgical once per week;
  • After 14 to 18 days, the surgeon removes stitches;
  • Cold compresses should be applied and kept on the foot for 20 minutes a few times per day, for the first week after the surgery.

Small bone fracture repair (osteosynthesis)

Osteosynthesis surgery can be performed to restore the integrity of small (hand and foot) bones, when the bones have complicated fractures or the ends of the damaged bone are displaced. Special implants (such as plates, screws, etc.) are used to restore the integrity. This treatment technique is superior to conservative treatment, because it enables the restoration of the structural integrity of the bone and early movement of the extremity. Also, this method lowers the risk of complications during bone healing process.

How Is the Surgery Performed?

The patient undergoes local or general anaesthesia, and the duration of osteosynthesis varies from 30 to 90 minutes. The surgical procedure embraces an open approach. Once the surgeon restores the integrity of the bone, it is fixed with proper implants (plates, screws, or other mechanical means).

What Should be Known After Surgery?

  • For 4-6 weeks, the affected area is immobilized in a plaster or cosmetic cast;
  • Once or twice a week the wound should be re-dressed;
  • After 10-14 days, the sutures are removed;
  • Usually, after 12 weeks the bones heal and the patient is able to resume routine activities.
  • Metal instruments (screws, plates etc.) are removed when the bones heal completely, usually after 1 year following the surgical procedure.

Endothetic joint replacement

When articular surfaces are worn due to osteoarthritis or previous traumas, which cause severe pain, and conservative treatment is not sufficient, a surgery for endoprosthetic joint replacement is required. Endoprosthetic joint replacement is indicated for diseases, when the joint tissue is deteriorating; However, it can also be necessary for older people with femoral neck fractures or for not re-constructible fractures around the shoulder or caput radii.  Endoprosthetic joint replacement surgery can be done on the joints of the shoulder, hip, knee, ankle, and great toe.

How Is the Surgery Performed?

The patient may undergo local, spinal, or general anaesthesia. Duration of the surgery can vary and strongly depends on which joint is being replaced.  The surgical procedure embraces an open approach. The surgeon removes damaged articular surfaces together with part of the underlying bone using specialized tools, and replaces the cartilage and bone, which is removed, with the components of an endoprosthesis.

The shape of polymeric, ceramic and metal implants resembles the shape of natural articular surfaces. Depending on the fixation technique used to hold the implant in place, there are 2 types of implants:

* Cemented implants, which are held in place by bone cement;

* Cement-less implants, which are covered with hydroxyapatite crystals that help the new bone grow into the surface of the implant. This implant technology is very suitable for physically active people, because it ensures greater longevity for an artificial joint.

What Should be Known After Surgery?

  • Once or twice a week the wound should be re-dressed;
  • After 10-14 days, the sutures are removed;
  • The patient can resume routine activities within three to four months;
  • Depending on which joint was replaced during the surgery, the doctor may give you specific postoperative care guidelines.

Articular cage repair

Articular cartilage is the white tissue, which covers the ends of bones where they meet to form joints. It is necessary to make the joints move easily, because it eases friction and allows the bones to glide over each other smoothly. In most cases, articular cartilage repair is required to treat a local cartilage defect and is not necessary for the treatment of generalized cartilage damage (such as advanced osteoarthritis).

Autologous chondrocyte implantation can be done to repair the articular cartilage. The process involves harvesting, culturing, multiplying, and re-implanting cartilage cells of the same person (autologous chondrocytes), or using cartilage substitutes.

How Is the Surgery Performed?

The patient undergoes spinal anaesthesia. Duration of the surgery can vary from 45 to 90 minutes. The surgeon arthroscopically identifies the location and size of a cartilage lesion. Taking into account the location of the identified lesion, the doctor makes an additional small incision. Then, using a cartilage substitute or cultured autologous chondrocytes the cartilage defect is covered, and the cover is sealed with fibrin glue.

What Should be Known After Surgery?

  • On the first day after the procedure, motions at the joint treated can be resumed;
  • It is advised to apply ice to the affected joint for two to four days;
  • Once or twice a week the wound should be re-dressed;
  • After 10-14 days, the sutures are removed;
  • After four weeks, it is allowed to bear weight on the affected foot;
  • Physical activity should be restricted for six weeks;
  • The patient can completely resume routine activities within 2-3 months.

Orthokine® therapy

The Orthokine®-therapy is a method of injection therapy that harnesses and enhances the body’s natural defence systems against inflammation to reduce pain and improve function. It is a unique way to treat osteoarthritis and back pain, without using of any foreign substances. The Orthokine®-therapy uses individual autologous proteins, which are derived from the patient’s blood, and then applied as a medication.

Helps to relieve pain and protects the joints

The Orthokine®-therapy makes use of anti-inflammatory and analgesic proteins developed from the blood, which can be injected into the nerve root or a diseased joint. One of the proteins is the Interleukin-1-Receptor-Antagonist, which acts as an anti-inflammatory and analgesic agent and therefore a cartilage and nerve protector. The injection is equivalent to a routine orthopaedic treatment, that is usually tolerated very well. Joint pain usually resolves quite quickly after treatment, and this leads to the improvement of joint function. Furthermore, the autologous serum eases pain and prevents nerve inflammation and back pain is reduced.

Benefits of the Orthokine®-therapy – Autologous Proteins against Arthritis:

  • Eases pain;
  • Improves ability to move;
  • Restrains degenerative joint diseases.

Benefits of the Orthokine®-therapy – Autologous Proteins against Back Pain:

  • Eases pain;
  • Restrains inflammation;
  • Provides a long lasting result.

When The Orthokine® method can be applied?

The Orthokine® method can be applied to several conditions simultaneously. Efficiency of the treatment has been proved to these injuries of the body without surgical treatment:

  • Joint osteoarthritis (stage I-III) – reduced pain;
  • Tendon and muscle damage;
  • Backache.

CONTACT US TODAY

phone

+353876691441

WE PROVIDE A FREE NO-OBLIGATION CONSULTATION